4 Ways Maxwell Monitors Relieves Stress for Facilities Managers

Facilities managers are the unsung heroes of any business. They are the ones who keep the lights on and the equipment running, reducing stress for everyone who works in the building. However, because facility managers operate behind the scenes, their workload can stack up without anyone else at the company even realizing it. 

Creating a stress-free work environment often starts with the building and facilities managers. Fortunately, we at Maxwell Roofing & Sheet Metal, Inc. launched Maxwell Monitors to help reduce stress for facilities managers and keep buildings safe for all employees. Under this new initiative, the Maxwell team will watch over the routine maintenance tasks in a building, so that facilities managers can stay focused on the more important elements of their job. 

Here are a few ways Maxwell Monitors eliminates the source of stress for facilities managers:

1. Maxwell Monitors helps you reduce your workload.

 Routine maintenance is a never ending, time-consuming task. Buildings need constant attention and care, even when there is other work to be done. Maxwell Monitors can eliminate this source of stress for facilities managers by taking over some of the basic, routine aspects of caring for a building.

2. Maxwell Monitors helps you keep your buildings in good shape.

For busy facilities managers, building maintenance and monitoring are often the things that get pushed aside for more urgent tasks. Over time, however, minor forgotten tasks can become big catastrophic problems. Maxwell Monitors can stop the effects of stress on a facilities manager from becoming a problem for an entire building by ensuring that routine maintenance continues even when other issues arise. 

3. Maxwell Monitors helps you create a plan of action.

Maxwell Monitors can be scaled to suit a company’s various needs, ultimately reducing building management stress. The program can accommodate anything from full-service monitoring to simply creating a tailored monthly maintenance checklist for your company’s facility management software. Maxwell Monitors can help any business create a plan of action to keep their building maintained and functioning.

4. Maxwell Monitors helps you get back to basics.

Maxwell Monitors was designed to keep your building and business functioning, no matter what circumstances arise. By handing off basic building monitoring and maintenance to the experts at Maxwell your facilities manager can get back to the core of their job.

 If you’re ready to plan or implement Maxwell Monitors into your roofing goals this year, don’t hesitate to contact us today. We’re equipped and ready to help!

5 Commercial Roofing Best Practices

A commercial roof is a significant investment in your building. As such, you want to be certain that the company you choose has your best interests in mind throughout the entire project. From the initial quote all the way through to maintaining your roof’s integrity, it’s vital that every step is handled properly. 

Safety, efficiency, and responsiveness are key when choosing a roofing partner, so we’re sharing a few commercial roofing best practices that will help you choose the right roofing company for your business

5 Commercial Roofing Best Practices

1. A Responsive Roofing Team

Commercial roofing installation and maintenance are very involved processes. For that reason, many roofers exclude their customers from the process—sometimes so that they can cut corners without the customer noticing. The best roofing partner, however, will include you and keep you informed throughout.

Transparency is a sign of a quality roofing contractor. Ensure that you’ve talked through your questions and concerns with your prospective roofing company before hiring. Their responsiveness to your questions will go a long way in helping you trust them with such a large investment.

2. A Focus on Safety

Reputable commercial roofing contractors follow OSHA’s safety guidelines closely. Human lives are no light matter; the company you choose must have guidelines in place to keep their workers safe. Safe job sites are a sign of a company that cares about its employees and its customers by extension.

3. Routine Inspections

Your roof can sustain potential damage from normal wear and tear. Roofing companies that are concerned with extending the life of your investment will insist on routine inspections. These inspections are to identify possible damages, even seemingly-small damages, that should be repaired before they snowball into larger, more expensive issues.

4. Proactive Maintenance

In line with the routine inspections we mentioned in the previous point, proactive maintenance is another essential element that will extend your roof’s lifecycle. Maintaining your roof proactively, rather than reactively, prevents damage down the line. Every year that you extend your roof’s life is another year that your business can keep a roof replacement off the budget.

Tip: Maxwell Roofing & Sheet Metal, Inc.’s MAXCare® program is the most comprehensive roof management program in the industry. With a customer engagement portal, MAXCare® gives you the tools to stay on top of inspections, maintenance, reports, invoices, and more.

5. An Emergency Helpline

When an issue does arise, such as a leak in your roof, a 24/7 emergency helpline is a much-needed resource. Roofing companies that offer emergency services are those that are more than a contractor; they’re your roofing partner. When you need them the most, you want them to be there to help—before the damage continues to worsen the structure of your roof or building. 

These five best practices are the foundation of the best commercial roofing partner for your business. Contact Maxwell Roofing & Sheet Metal, Inc. today to discuss your commercial roofing needs or to get a quote. Our team of experts is here to answer your questions and walk you through what you may need and how to get started.

Preventative Roofing Maintenance: Tips for Your Common Weather Woes

Commercial roofs are under constant assault from Mother Nature. They are built to withstand weather events like run-of-the mill thunderstorms, rain storms, periods of sustained winds and snowfall. However, all roofs are vulnerable to extreme weather events and you won’t necessarily know just how vulnerable your roof is until something happens. The good news? You can take steps to help guard against weather damage and to receive alerts when wind, hail, rain or ice/snow does a number on your roof.

The Best Defense in Roofing Is A Good Offense

The most important thing that building managers can do to protect the integrity of their roofing system is to know the condition of the roof. Regular, professional roofing inspections can identify damage or defects and can also identify potential vulnerabilities should a nasty weather event occur. In between inspections, facilities managers should conduct check-ups to monitor the roof and to identify any new issues as soon as possible.

Knowing the condition of the roof is important, but it’s only half the battle. Management should be prepared to correct the defects and damage found during inspections and self-checkups. Facilities staff can seal cracks, secure areas that may be vulnerable to high winds, and remove puddled water. Any preventative measures should be shared with your commercial roofing partner, however, so that they can examine those small issues and create a plan for a permanent fix. Putting off repairs, however minor, can leave the roof system vulnerable in the event of a storm.

Keep “Eyes” On The Roof In Any Weather

Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a way to receive an alert if something happened to the roofing system instead of discovering water on the floor of the building? There is a product on the market called Roof Monitor™ that keeps tabs on the conditions of the roof 24/7/365.

The product keeps tabs on water and snow load on flat and low-slope roofs and it alerts building managers if the roof’s perimeter is breached or if the deck experiences sag. The sensors send a signal that triggers a call to building managers and immediately dispatches an authorized repair team to the site to assess the situation and make necessary fixes to protect the roofing system.

Ice And Snow Don’t Have To Cause Stress

They say everything is bigger in the South, and when it comes to hail, nothing could be more true. All southerners are familiar with the sounds and the stresses of a hailstorm which can pound ice chunks on a roof at speeds of 90 miles per hour. Hail can wreak havoc on a commercial roof, and it’s important to take precautions to protect sensitive systems. Installing a high-density coverboard over the insulation and under the membrane can guard against hail damage.

There isn’t much snow in the South, but Northern states can deal with several feet of snow over the course of a winter. Those loads can lead to serious roof damage, and in worst cases, collapse. It is good practice to install heating coils on a roof to melt snow in the event of a heavy storm, guarding against major malfunctions.

Whether it’s rain, hail, snow, or wind, Mother Nature can cause real damage to roofing systems. Regular professional inspections and self-checkups are important to keep tabs on the physical conditions of the roof. Construction features like coverboards and heating coils can provide extra protection, as can a sensor system like Roof Monitor™. When it comes to all-weather roofing, prevention is the best medicine.

How To Ensure On-Site Safety During a Roofing Project

Property managers and building owners have a responsibility to keep the occupants and visitors in their building safe at all times. That responsibility can be complicated when roofing teams are onsite to conduct repairs or to replace the roof system. Roof repair and re-roofing projects can be dangerous work, with many potential hazards for anyone in and around the property. Before any work begins, it is necessary to have some serious discussions about safety.

Continue reading “How To Ensure On-Site Safety During a Roofing Project”

How Much Do You Really Know? 5 Things Every Facility Manager Needs To Know About Their Roof

The roof is one of the most important components of the building, but “out of sight is out of mind”. SO, many facilities managers and property owners tend to forget their roofs until a problem arises. This approach leads to repetitive leaks, ongoing patch jobs, expensive repairs and ultimately that, “Oh no” moment of panic and dread when the roof needs to be replaced. Now, facilities managers can learn about and understand what’s happening above them. Here are five things that every facility manager needs to know about their roof.

#1: What Is The Leak History of the Roof?

The leak history of a roof tells the story of what’s going on in a roofing system. The pattern and presence of leaks over time can inform diagnosis of the problem. Repeated leaks around skylights, for example, may indicate a construction defect rather than roof damage. (That’s right, roof leaks are often more a result of a design or construction flaw than a roof defect, per se.)

Leak history can also help the contractor more accurately assess the roof’s potential remaining life. A complete record of where water has gotten in and how it was repaired can help the contractor and Owner know whether or not water has infiltrated the roof system and saturated the insulation – which is the death knell for a roof.

#2: Who Is Getting On The Roof?

While Mother Nature can be hard on a roof, humans are usually a roofing system’s biggest enemy. If a roof is accessible to tenants or to other trade contractors for heating, ventilation and air conditioning; and other repairs, the roof is at risk of puncture, cuts, tears, and other damage.

Controlling access to the roof is essential for protecting the integrity of the roofing system. However, facilities managers don’t need to be fearful of granting access. People who use the roof should be able to come to the manager and let them know if they inadvertently caused damage. That means being friendly and available to tenants, repair workers and contractors who want access to the roof. Good access control and good communication allows managers to track issues they may never have known about otherwise.

#3: What Are the Safety Hazards Of The Roof?

Every roof is rife with safety hazards beyond the sheer height of the building. Some hazards are obvious, such as the edge of the roof being a fall hazard. Others are not quite as evident.

Skylights can be an extreme hazard. These features are not built for sitting or holding a lot of weight, and people on the roof may be tempted to rest on top of one, or place toolboxes on the skylight, putting themselves and the people inside in danger. Hidden corners, drop-offs and L-corners are also a hazard for anyone walking on a roof, especially they have never been on that particular building before. It’s easy to approach edges and corners in non-square layouts without realizing it.

#4: How Is The Roof Made

A thorough facilities manager should know as much as possible about the way the roof is built including:

  • When the roof was built
  • Where the design plans are
  • The roofing materials
  • The manufacturers of those materials
  • The company that installed the roof
  • The terms of the warranty

Knowing these details can help form a baseline understanding of the roof itself, and allows the facilities manager to communicate more effectively with a roofing contractor.

#5: When Was The Last Inspection?

Regular roofing inspections are the key to maintaining a roof that performs well and lasts as long as possible. One of the most important things a facility manager needs to know about their roof is the inspection history. If it has been more than a year, or if no one on the facilities team has any idea when the last inspection was, it’s been too long.

These roofing inspections help get ahead of major issues, keep the facilities team in the loop on areas to watch and conditions to observe, and ensure that budgets can properly be set for future repairs and re-roofing projects.

The more familiar the facilities manager becomes with the roof, the better. When it comes to prolonging roof life, choose a good contractor and make strong repair decisions, always keep in mind that you can never be armed with too much information. It is worth the time for a facility manager to learn and file away as much information as possible about their roof, in order to get the most value from the system.

The 4 Questions You Must Ask Before You Hire A Roofing Contractor

A new roof is one of the biggest single-item capital expenditures for any commercial building owner. A new roof can cost anywhere from few dollars per square foot to a few hundred dollars per square foot. It is imperative that any roofer who steps onto the roof is experienced, trusted and will provide the best value for the investment. Hiring a roofing contractor should never be a leap of blind faith. To properly vet a potential contractor, these are the questions that should be answered before a final decision is made:

How Much Experience Do You Have?

Experience matters when it comes to commercial roofing. The number of years that a contractor has been in the business is a good indicator of their quality of work. New companies may come to the table with a breadth of previous experience, but it can take years to become financially solvent and to develop processes that ensure true customer satisfaction. If a company installs a roof and goes out of business the next year, warranties and maintenance contracts are put in jeopardy. Always choose a roofer that has at least a decade of proven work experience under their belt, and be sure they have operated under the same business name during that time.

It is also important to choose a roofer with experience working on buildings similar to your own. A company that mainly works with single-story, suburban retail buildings, for example, would not be the best choice to work on a high-rise with tenant access. Study the roofer’s portfolio to compare their past projects with your own.

What Is The Timeline?

A roofing company that is booked for the next 12 months is of little use if your roof is failing today. Before selecting a bid, be sure to address the contractor’s capacity to handle the work. Ask questions like:

  • When can the project start?
  • Will you have access to all of the extra equipment needed for the work?
  • How long will the job take?
  • Do you currently have enough people on staff to get the job done in the allotted time?

A bottom-line bid is not always an indication of capacity to do the work. Be sure to ask these questions to ensure your project can start and end in a timely manner.

What Is Your Safety Rating?

Safety should be just as much of a priority when choosing a roofer as budget. There cannot be enough said about keeping the workers on the roof safe from hazards and keeping the tenants and general public safe, as well.

Ask direct questions about a roofer’s safety record. They should have this data on file, and should be willing and able to present it as part of their bid presentation. The way in which a roofing contractor manages safety can be a strong indicator of how the entire project will be managed.

How Can You Ensure Quality?

Quality can and should be the deciding factor when you have several bids that come in at the same price, and the experience and safety record of the contractors all seem equal.

Quality can be determined by studying a potential contractor’s portfolio and asking for references. Most reputable firms should be able to provide references for similar projects. If given the opportunity to connect directly with those references, ask about their satisfaction levels with:

  • The communication process with the contractor before, during and after construction.
  • The quality of materials.
  • The workmanship of the finished product.
  • The work ethic of the team.
  • Safety precautions during construction.
  • Maintenance contracts, warranties, etc.
  • Current roof performance.

A roofing project that is rife with issues can draw out the length of construction, can lead to unforeseen added expenses and a host of other issues down the line. While the price of the roof is important, the quality of the roof and the value proposition of the contractor should be given significant weight.

Commercial roofing projects can easily fall into the $100,000-plus range. When spending that kind of money, building owners and property managers must perform their due diligence. Take the time to ask questions to a roofer before hiring them. A proper vetting process is the best way to ensure satisfaction with the end result.

Risk Management 101: How to Protect Yourself Against Damage, Injury and Liability

As a building owner or property manager, do you feel protected? With any roofing project, you need to be aware of the various concerns that could affect the success, cost, and timeline of your build. There are safety and liability concerns – and what about the roof and building itself? In this introductory piece, we’ll explore all the aspects of roof work that you need to consider so that you can manage the risk.

Continue reading “Risk Management 101: How to Protect Yourself Against Damage, Injury and Liability”

Before the Work Begins: How a Job Hazard Analysis Protects Owners and Contractors

Property owners or managers could be liable for any damage or injuries that occur on their properties or worksites. Thus, it’s vital that they not only understand how they can influence safety on the job site, but also why it’s vital to hire a contractor who is safety conscious. By ensuring safety at the job site, diligent, responsible contractors do more than just look out for the health and well-being of their workers. Strong safety measures ensure efficient work and reduce the probability that either the owner or the contractor will be subject to costly legal repercussions should a problem occur. It all starts with analyzing and communicating the potential hazards.

Continue reading “Before the Work Begins: How a Job Hazard Analysis Protects Owners and Contractors”